LATEST CASES & UPDATES

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🌻 Meet Frankie! 🌻
This beautiful persian came to us when he had only just turned 11 months old for some GI upsets he had been having since he was a little kitten 🐱. Frankie had been dealing with recurrent vomiting, diarrhoea or inappetence since his family got him at around 14 weeks old 🤢. At first it was believed to have been dietary related so he was moved from one diet to another until he seemed to settle on the Royal Canin Sensitivity diet. Unfortunately for Frankie that only seemed to work for 6 months before he started showing the same symptoms again so it was decided that he needed to be seen by our Internal Medicine Specialist Dr Mike Coleman for an abdominal ultrasound 👨‍⚕️.
During the abdominal ultrasound, Dr Coleman was able to identify an irregular thickening of the ileum wall. As Frankie was already under a light sedation it was decided that taking some ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirates (FNA’s) of the intestinal mass was required to identify if it was due to a chronic inflammatory response or neoplastic disease (cancerous).
Unfortunately, the results were not what we wanted. Frankie had lymphoma and after weighing up the pros and cons of surgical removal it was decided that surgery was not the best option for Frankie. Dr Coleman started Frankie on his first chemotherapy treatment of intravenous Vincristine and oral steroids for at home 💊, Frankie returned to us in the last week of February for a one week check up, and all going well his second chemotherapy course. We were all very excited to see that Frankie was still his cuddly kitten self; and once his bloods were checked he was ready to have his next chemo treatment of cyclophosphamide 💉.
Frankie had a total of 12 treatments over 6 months and we are happy to announce that as of the end of August he has graduated from his chemotherapy course! 🎉🎉
Well done Frankie, we are all so excited and proud of you! 🥳🥰
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🌻 Meet Frankie! 🌻
This beautiful persian came to us when he had only just turned 11 months old for some GI upsets he had been having since he was a little kitten 🐱. Frankie had been dealing with recurrent vomiting, diarrhoea or inappetence since his family got him at around 14 weeks old 🤢. At first it was believed to have been dietary related so he was moved from one diet to another until he seemed to settle on the Royal Canin Sensitivity diet. Unfortunately for Frankie that only seemed to work for 6 months before he started showing the same symptoms again so it was decided that he needed to be seen by our Internal Medicine Specialist Dr Mike Coleman for an abdominal ultrasound 👨‍⚕️. 
During the abdominal ultrasound, Dr Coleman was able to identify an irregular thickening of the ileum wall. As Frankie was already under a light sedation it was decided that taking some ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirates (FNA’s) of the intestinal mass was required to identify if it was due to a chronic inflammatory response or neoplastic disease (cancerous). 
Unfortunately, the results were not what we wanted. Frankie had lymphoma and after weighing up the pros and cons of surgical removal it was decided that surgery was not the best option for Frankie. Dr Coleman started Frankie on his first chemotherapy treatment of intravenous Vincristine and oral steroids for at home 💊, Frankie returned to us in the last week of February for a one week check up, and all going well his second chemotherapy course. We were all very excited to see that Frankie was still his cuddly kitten self; and once his bloods were checked he was ready to have his next chemo treatment of cyclophosphamide 💉.
Frankie had a total of 12 treatments over 6 months and we are happy to announce that as of the end of August he has graduated from his chemotherapy course! 🎉🎉 
Well done Frankie, we are all so excited and proud of you! 🥳🥰

Comment on Facebook

Poor baby. What so many animals go through and only their caring owners and fantastic veterinary professionals know about it. Well done again team 🤗

Well done VSA team. You always have the solutions, costly it may be but worth it to save a family fur baby. Thank you as always

❤️❤️❤️yay, so glad Frankie

11 months :O

🐾 C H O P P E R 🐾
Chopper was not having a good week when he presented to the team at Franklin Vets Pets in Beachlands with an odd combination of clinical signs. The team there performed a physical assessment discovering Chopper was unable to support himself and had delayed reflexes on both forelimbs.

Chopper was then transferred to our VS A&E team with Dr Liz Means. Weighing in at 55kg, Chopper was carried in on a stretcher for Dr Means who decided that he needed an immediate in-house CT scan of his head and neck to further assess what had caused his acute forelimb lameness .

Dr Ben Wernham, one of our specialist radiologists read Chopper’s CT as he was being scanned and saw a large volume of intervertebral disc extrusion around the C2 – C3 area; causing a severe compression of the spinal cord. This lesion was strongly suspected of being the cause for Chopper’s lameness and a surgical decompression was advised.

Chopper was taken to surgery the next day with Dr Richard Jerram and our Zoetis intern Dr Laura Kelly for a C2 – C3 ventral slot surgery. Ventral slot surgery is the technique used to remove the large amount of disc material from the spinal canal. The surgery took just under 2.5 hours to decompress Chopper’s spinal cord. Surgery and anaesthesia all went well and Chopper was recovered with one of our VS A&E nurses Michelle 👩‍⚕️.

Chopper stayed with us for a whole week until he gained enough strength back to stand up on his own and walk with support from his Help Em Up Harness. His family decided the next best step for Chopper’s full recovery was to stay with the team at The Doggery so that he could have one-on-one care and monitoring 💛.

Chopper is now home with his family who are happy to have him back to his normal cuddly self and watching him get stronger every day. 🐶✨
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🐾 C H O P P E R 🐾
Chopper was not having a good week when he presented to the team at Franklin Vets Pets in Beachlands with an odd combination of clinical signs. The team there performed a physical assessment discovering Chopper was unable to support himself and had delayed reflexes on both forelimbs.

Chopper was then transferred to our VS A&E team with Dr Liz Means. Weighing in at 55kg, Chopper was carried in on a stretcher for Dr Means who decided that he needed an immediate in-house CT scan of his head and neck to further assess what had caused his acute forelimb lameness . 

Dr Ben Wernham, one of our specialist radiologists read Chopper’s CT as he was being scanned and saw a large volume of intervertebral disc extrusion around the C2 - C3 area; causing a severe compression of the spinal cord. This lesion was strongly suspected of being the cause for Choppers lameness and a surgical decompression was advised. 

Chopper was taken to surgery the next day with Dr Richard Jerram and our Zoetis intern Dr Laura Kelly for a C2 - C3 ventral slot surgery. Ventral slot surgery is the technique used to remove the large amount of disc material from the spinal canal. The surgery took just under 2.5 hours to decompress Choppers spinal cord. Surgery and anaesthesia all went well and Chopper was recovered with one of our VS A&E nurses Michelle 👩‍⚕️. 

Chopper stayed with us for a whole week until he gained enough strength back to stand up on his own and walk with support from his Help Em Up Harness. His family decided the next best step for Choppers full recovery was to stay with the team at The Doggery so that he could have one-on-one care and monitoring 💛. 

Chopper is now home with his family who are happy to have him back to his normal cuddly self and watching him get stronger every day. 🐶✨

Comment on Facebook

Thank you for all of the care you all provided for my baby Chopper 🥰🥰 I want to thank the marvelous team for being there for him and me when he got sick. It was very sad and tough moment for all of us and I appreciate the time you let me cry in the office. Chopper has beaten all odds and definitely defied the manual with his miracle recovery 🙏 We cannot express how much we appreciate the kindness and professionalism you all showed. Thank you all so much for taking good care of my baby. Chopper is back to his usual mischief and totally getting spoilt !! He is happy to be back with his buddies Kutts and Mud and absolutely loving the attention ❤ 💖 May God bless you all 🙏🙏

We loved having this gentleman in our care and he was an absolute softie in nature. Chopper made good progress during his 10 day rest & recuperation – with much enjoyment being pampered with massage, heat packs and physio exercises. He also loved being in the countryside and loved his gentle walks to observe nature. We continue to wish Chopper and his family a speedy recovery.🐾💙🐕

Yes the team at VSA are amazing as is the after care at the Doggery 👍🏻😊Chopper is a beautiful dog 😊

Our cutie is back to normal. VS team did a great job.

Wow Chopper, welcome home boy.

Wow wonderful team..all the best Chopper for a full recovery..xx

Amazing team. Yay for Chopper 🐾💗

The poor baby, he must have gone through much pain and distress and can't even express. I am relieved that the child is fine now. My heart missed several beats as I started reading the post. These children are gifts of God. Shalini, please take it easy.

Amazing team work! Great stuff!

Well done team another success… what a sweet looking boy x

Awesome result! What a GORGEOUS boy ❤️

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🌟 Introducing Sienna! 🌟

This little golden retriever puppy came to us when she was only 11 weeks old! Her new family had her for only 5 days before realising that something wasn’t quite right about their little girl and had her checked over by the skilled team at The Strand Vet 👩‍⚕️. Sienna had a history of UTI’s and The Strand team suspected this might have occurred again. The urine results revealed the problem was not a simple UTI, so an ultrasound was indicated and then performed by one of our imaging specialists, Dr Devon Thompson. The ultrasound revealed an uncommon condition called ectopic ureters. Ectopic ureters, in short, are a congenital (born with it) defect where the ureters that should normally transport urine from the kidneys to the bladder bypass the bladder and connect to the urethra. This means the bladder doesn’t store urine, and the dog shows signs of urinary incontinence (leaking). This is a defect that can only be corrected with a specialised surgery.

A few days later, Sienna developed blisters around her vulva, which indicated a higher level of discomfort and severity. Sienna was referred to our Sylvia Park hospital to see our emergency vet Dr Liz Means. After a few days in hospital, Sienna was much more comfortable, and stable enough for further investigation. Dr Alastair Coomer, one of our surgical specialists, consulted on Sienna’s case and Sienna was quickly scheduled for an in-house CT scan of her abdomen followed by cystoscopy. A cystoscopy procedure is where the vet uses a small camera to examine the inside of the patient’s urinary tract. This allows us to get a visual idea on how the inside of the urinary tract actually looks, which cannot be accurately assessed in any other way. The results of the CT scan and cystoscope were alarming: not only were the ectopic ureters confirmed, but also showed the entire lining of the bladder, urethra and vagina was mineralised. This is caused by an exceptionally rare form of encrusting infection, and explained why Sienna was so sick and painful 🤒.

The next day Sienna was placed under a general anaesthesia and taken down to surgery with Dr Coomer and Dr Aparna Tikekar for her neoureter ("new ureter") surgery. This surgery was necessary to reimplant Siennas incorrectly attached ureters and to clear her urinary bladder of the mineralised material. In an effort to prevent the new ureter openings from becoming blocked with mineral, retrievable ureteral stents were placed at the same time. Surgery and anaesthesia both went smoothly with no concerns and Sienna recovered very well after her surgery.

Sienna then stayed in hospital with us for a further 12 more days for intensive post operative management of her infection 🏨. Thankfully, within this time, the calcification of her vulva and bladder healed and returned to normal! In total Sienna spent 21 days with us and quickly became the favourite patient of everyone at our Sylvia Park hospital, and was spoilt with lots of cuddles and play time 🥰. Sienna is now back home with her very excited family who have missed their puppy over the last 3 weeks 🐶.

Earlier this week, Dr. Coomer repeated Sienna’s cystoscopy to remove her ureteral stents. Her bladder has healed beautifully, and she is well on the road to a complete recovery.

We can’t wait to see you again Sienna and hope you’re healing well! 🐾
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🌟 Introducing Sienna! 🌟

This little golden retriever puppy came to us when she was only 11 weeks old! Her new family had her for only 5 days before realising that something wasn’t quite right about their little girl and had her checked over by the skilled team at The Strand Vet 👩‍⚕️. Sienna had a history of UTI’s and The Strand team suspected this might have occurred again. The urine results revealed the problem was not a simple UTI, so an ultrasound was indicated and then performed by one of our imaging specialists, Dr Devon Thompson. The ultrasound revealed an uncommon condition called ectopic ureters. Ectopic ureters, in short, are a congenital (born with it) defect where the ureters that should normally transport urine from the kidneys to the bladder bypass the bladder and connect to the urethra. This means the bladder doesnt store urine, and the dog shows signs of urinary incontinence (leaking). This is a defect that can only be corrected with a specialised surgery. 

A few days later, Sienna developed blisters around her vulva, which indicated a higher level of discomfort and severity. Sienna was referred to our Sylvia Park hospital to see our emergency vet Dr Liz Means. After a few days in hospital, Sienna was much more comfortable, and stable enough for further investigation.  Dr Alastair Coomer, one of our surgical specialists, consulted on Siennas case and Sienna was quickly scheduled for an in-house CT scan of her abdomen followed by cystoscopy. A cystoscopy procedure is where the vet uses a small camera to examine the inside of the patients urinary tract. This allows us to get a visual idea on how the inside of the urinary tract actually looks, which cannot be accurately assessed in any other way. The results of the CT scan and cystoscope were alarming: not only were the ectopic ureters confirmed, but also showed the entire lining of the bladder, urethra and vagina was mineralised. This is caused by an exceptionally rare form of encrusting infection, and explained why Sienna was so sick and painful 🤒. 

The next day Sienna was placed under a general anaesthesia and taken down to surgery with Dr Coomer and Dr Aparna Tikekar for her neoureter (new ureter) surgery. This surgery was necessary to reimplant Siennas incorrectly attached ureters and to clear her urinary bladder of the mineralised material. In an effort to prevent the new ureter openings from becoming blocked with mineral, retrievable ureteral stents were placed at the same time. Surgery and anaesthesia both went smoothly with no concerns and Sienna recovered very well after her surgery. 

Sienna then stayed in hospital with us for a further 12 more days for intensive post operative management of her infection 🏨. Thankfully, within this time, the calcification of her vulva and bladder healed and returned to normal! In total Sienna spent 21 days with us and quickly became the favourite patient of everyone at our Sylvia Park hospital, and was spoilt with lots of cuddles and play time 🥰. Sienna is now back home with her very excited family who have missed their puppy over the last 3 weeks 🐶.

Earlier this week, Dr. Coomer repeated Siennas cystoscopy to remove her ureteral stents. Her bladder has healed beautifully, and she is well on the road to a complete recovery. 

We cant wait to see you again Sienna and hope youre healing well! 🐾

Comment on Facebook

Poor little pup – she must have been so uncomfortable. What an incredible surgery! <3

You guys are amazing 🥰🐶 What a beautiful puppy so glad she is healed and back with her family 😘

Wow she went to the right family didnt she? Hope the breeder was made aware.

I hope they had her insured.

Beautiful girl 🐶, lucky to be in a family who acted quickly. 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 to all vets involved, love a happy ending. One of our pets 🐶 was a patient at VSA a few times. On the day we had to say goodbye 😭 to our beautiful wee girl, the staff could not have been more caring, thank you again. Also 👏🏻 to Sommerville Vets for referring us to VSA 💕🐶.

GO you guys!! You saved my dogs over the years I hope Sienna recovers and leads a normal life!

Oh wow Sienna..that's quite a wee journey (no pun intended) as that was no mean feat for you or the surgeons..how lucky are you honey to have such a wonderfully skilled team and an amazingly loving family..well done..bless you..💗

You are all amazing and one beautiful puppy💗🐾

One very lucky pup and another incredible surgery by the VSA team.

Oh my goodness, well done Team! ♥️♥️

Awesome work from Alastair & team 🙂 What a gorgeous pup!

Yay! Well done Team 🙂

Great work again by a fabulous caring team. Keep safe and well everyone

Well done team…amazing story of collaboration and a true reminder exceptional care for our patients can be done together x The Strand Vet team

Amazing example of the entire veterinary team – referring vets, after hours team and specialists working together ❤️

Amazing work with a great result 👍

She is just gorgeous – awesome care!

Aww what a beautiful girl so pleased you are better.💕

Wow that’s one brave little pup.

Hopefully the breeder stops breeding for these lines

Awesome stuff Dr Coomer!! 👍

What a brave pup 😍

Outstanding !

Christine Waters

Will Frederick

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How cool are these! 🤩
Huge shout out to the kids in Room 2 at St Dominic’s School for these beautiful cards we received during our previous lockdown. 🥰 They have brought such a big smile to the VSA teams at our Mount Albert and Sylvia Park hospitals so we thought we should share them with you all! 😁🌟
We hope everyone gets a smile from these awesome cards like we have.
Thank you Room 2, you guys rock! 🎉🎉
Happy Friday everyone and stay safe 🐾
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How cool are these! 🤩
Huge shout out to the kids in Room 2 at St Dominics School for these beautiful cards we received during our previous lockdown. 🥰 They have brought such a big smile to the VSA teams at our Mount Albert and Sylvia Park hospitals so we thought we should share them with you all! 😁🌟
We hope everyone gets a smile from these awesome cards like we have. 
Thank you Room 2, you guys rock! 🎉🎉
Happy Friday everyone and stay safe 🐾

Auckland is heading back into Alert Level 3 at midday today (Wednesday 12 August).

Veterinary Specialists Auckland is still operating under Alert Level 3.

We will still be seeing patients as booked, but now with some additional safety measure to protect you and our Team.

Here’s how we are going to keep you safe:
– Client’s will not be allowed in the building from today
– Consults will be done remotely by phone
– Our staff will be wearing face shields, masks and gowns to admit patients
– We will not take any leads or other items from you into the hospital
– We will remain 2 metres apart when admitting patients
– We will keep contact tracing records

To protect our team please reschedule any consults if you or anyone in your household feels sick.

Please try and keep our phone lines free for emergencies.

Stay safe!
The VSA Team
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Auckland is heading back into Alert Level 3 at midday today (Wednesday 12 August).

Veterinary Specialists Auckland is still operating under Alert Level 3.

We will still be seeing patients as booked, but now with some additional safety measure to protect you and our Team.

Heres how we are going to keep you safe:
- Clients will not be allowed in the building from today
- Consults will be done remotely by phone
- Our staff will be wearing face shields, masks and gowns to admit patients
- We will not take any leads or other items from you into the hospital
- We will remain 2 metres apart when admitting patients
- We will keep contact tracing records

To protect our team please reschedule any consults if you or anyone in your household feels sick.

Please try and keep our phone lines free for emergencies.

Stay safe!
The VSA Team

Comment on Facebook

Kia mihi! Kia kaha! Thank you! Keep up the great work you do , helping us provide the best care for our patients. Dr J 💖

Meet Tuan Tuan 🐶. A much loved Bichon Frise who came to see the A&E team at our Sylvia Park hospital late one evening.

Tuan Tuan is normally a bright and active dog, but on this day she was feeling under the weather. It started with a mild cough in the morning but by late evening had become heavier and much more discomforting.
Tuan Tuan’s owners called the VSA&E team to get some advice – during the call the coughing was so bad our nurse could hear it through the phone.

Arriving at our hospital, Tuan Tuan’s breathing was definitely abnormal. During sedation to have some x rays taken of her chest her condition became worse, so we put a tube in to help her breathe and ran some blood tests.
Her owners did not think she had eaten any toxins, but we had treated her for eating rat bait only a month prior and since arriving in the hospital, she had also developed some swelling where the injection had been given. Sure enough, her clotting times were off the scale, confirming a likely diagnosis of rat bait toxicity.

Tuan Tuan’s battle was only just beginning. She was given the antidote straight away but it takes several hours to take effect, so she also needed a plasma transfusion, which provided enough clotting factors to help tide her over until the antidote started to work. By doing this we were able to minimise the damage from any ongoing bleeding, but we still had to deal with the symptoms from the extensive bleeding into her lungs that had already occurred. Things were very touch and go for Tuan Tuan overnight and into the next day.

With our A&E service now open 24 hours, we were able to monitor and continue to look after Tuan Tuan during these critical stages. Tuan Tuan still needed a breathing tube and oxygen supplementation because her lungs had suffered so much bleeding. We were also able to organise an ultrasound for her right there beside her bed with one of our specialist veterinary radiologists and give the owner some real-time information about her progress.

As the day progressed, we continued with nursing care for Tuan Tuan – gently coupaging her chest to help her loosen and resorb the blood, massaging her limbs and circulating the breathing tube so it didn’t get blocked. It was a race against time to see if her body could process the blood in her lungs before she got too exhausted.

Late in the evening, our emergency vet noticed some signs that her breathing had begun to ease. We were able to remove her breathing tube and gradually reduce her oxygen support throughout the early hours.

At last, the moment our team and her owners had all been waiting for arrived. A very small, but ultimately mighty tail wag that got everyone excited. Tuan Tuan’s owners who had never given up hope were over the moon and incredibly happy to have her home less than 24 hours later. Today, Tuan Tuan is back to being the happy and bright wee dog her owners adore.

If you hear your pet coughing, and you notice it getting worse, give your vet a call. And if it’s after hours or on weekends, we are here to offer advice, support and emergency care, just like we did for Tuan Tuan ☺
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Meet Tuan Tuan 🐶.  A much loved Bichon Frise who came to see the A&E team at our Sylvia Park hospital late one evening.

Tuan Tuan is normally a bright and active dog, but on this day she was feeling under the weather. It started with a mild cough in the morning but by late evening had become heavier and much more discomforting. 
Tuan Tuans owners called the VSA&E team to get some advice - during the call the coughing was so bad our nurse could hear it through the phone.

Arriving at our hospital, Tuan Tuans breathing was definitely abnormal. During sedation to have some x rays taken of her chest her condition became worse, so we put a tube in to help her breathe and ran some blood tests. 
Her owners did not think she had eaten any toxins, but we had treated her for eating rat bait only a month prior and since arriving in the hospital, she had also developed some swelling where the injection had been given. Sure enough, her clotting times were off the scale, confirming a likely diagnosis of rat bait toxicity. 

Tuan Tuan’s battle was only just beginning. She was given the antidote straight away but it takes several hours to take effect, so she also needed a plasma transfusion, which provided enough clotting factors to help tide her over until the antidote started to work. By doing this we were able to minimise the damage from any ongoing bleeding, but we still had to deal with the symptoms from the extensive bleeding into her lungs that had already occurred. Things were very touch and go for Tuan Tuan overnight and into the next day.

With our A&E service now open 24 hours, we were able to monitor and continue to look after Tuan Tuan during these critical stages. Tuan Tuan still needed a breathing tube and oxygen supplementation because her lungs had suffered so much bleeding. We were also able to organise an ultrasound for her right there beside her bed with one of our specialist veterinary radiologists and give the owner some real-time information about her progress.

As the day progressed, we continued with nursing care for Tuan Tuan – gently coupaging her chest to help her loosen and resorb the blood, massaging her limbs and circulating the breathing tube so it didn’t get blocked. It was a race against time to see if her body could process the blood in her lungs before she got too exhausted.

Late in the evening, our emergency vet noticed some signs that her breathing had begun to ease. We were able to remove her breathing tube and gradually reduce her oxygen support throughout the early hours.  

At last, the moment our team and her owners had all been waiting for arrived.  A very small, but ultimately mighty tail wag that got everyone excited. Tuan Tuan’s owners who had never given up hope were over the moon and incredibly happy to have her home less than 24 hours later. Today, Tuan Tuan is back to being the happy and bright wee dog her owners adore. 

If you hear your pet coughing, and you notice it getting worse, give your vet a call. And if its after hours or on weekends, we are here to offer advice, support and emergency care, just like we did for Tuan Tuan ☺

Comment on Facebook

Amazing standard of care – so grateful to have access to VSGA&E in addition to specialist referral – and the Mt Wellington location serves those of us travelling from “ south of the Bombay’s” really well . LOVE YOUR WORK!

What a wonderful team you are.

💗 No more rat bait Tuan Tuan! Great work vsa.

Can’t speak more highly of the team at Veterinary Specialist, they are amazing

☑️From today, our dedicated A&E service will be open at Sylvia Park 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. 👨‍⚕️👩‍⚕️

☑️During normal business hours, your regular vet will be able to attend to the majority of your pets’ needs. At A&E we don’t provide routine or preventative vet care, and we don’t do vaccinations.
But if their day is just too busy to fit everything in, and they need to refer an emergency case to us, we are now open 24 hours a day to provide you and your pets the very best care.

☑️And as always, if you have an after-hours emergency, we are just a phone call away.

☑️We hope you never have to see us… but if you ever do, our expert team is always here, and we look forward to caring for you and your pets 😊
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☑️From today, our dedicated A&E service will be open at Sylvia Park 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.  👨‍⚕️👩‍⚕️  

☑️During normal business hours, your regular vet will be able to attend to the majority of your pets’ needs.  At A&E we don’t provide routine or preventative vet care, and we don’t do vaccinations. 
But if their day is just too busy to fit everything in, and they need to refer an emergency case to us, we are now open 24 hours a day to provide you and your pets the very best care. 

☑️And as always, if you have an after-hours emergency, we are just a phone call away.

☑️We hope you never have to see us… but if you ever do, our expert team is always here, and we look forward to caring for you and your pets 😊

Comment on Facebook

India good to know 🙂

Helen 👌🏼

Happy Queens Birthday Everyone!

Our A&E team 👩‍⚕️🧑‍⚕️are working hard over the whole weekend to provide emergency 🤒🤕🤧veterinary care for your furry family members 🐶🐱🐰.

Feel free to call us at any time on 09 3205645 if you need some advice or to see one of our emergency veterinary team!
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Happy Queens Birthday Everyone! 

Our A&E team 👩‍⚕️🧑‍⚕️are working hard over the whole weekend to provide emergency 🤒🤕🤧veterinary care for your furry family members 🐶🐱🐰. 

Feel free to call us at any time on 09 3205645 if you need some advice or to see one of our emergency veterinary team!

Comment on Facebook

I hope you do get some time off. Keep safe and well and enjoy your weekend

✨ Meet Layla ✨, a beautiful kitten adopted from the SPCA New Zealand 🐾. Unfortunately, she became very sick and was diagnosed with a condition called pyothorax. This is a condition where a large amount of pus builds up in the chest cavity, preventing the animal from breathing properly. We don’t always find out the cause of pyothorax, but it can be caused by a bite wound penetrating into the chest cavity, pneumonia or other infection in the lungs, or a foreign body (like a grass seed) migrating into the chest🌾.

Layla was diagnosed and had chest drains placed at an after hours clinic overnight, then returned to her regular vet clinic Pet Doctors the next morning. Chest drains ideally need 24 hour monitoring and care at a veterinary clinic to prevent any complications, so her vet referred her to our VSA&E team for 24 hour management👩‍⚕️.

Layla remained in hospital with us for just under 2 weeks, getting regular drainage and flushing of her chest drains and receiving intravenous fluid therapy and antibiotics💊, as well as plenty of cuddles from our nurses💛. Over the 2 weeks Layla showed constant improvement, she regained her appetite, became very smoochy and happy and her breathing returned to normal 🌟. Once the fluid production from her drains stopped we were able to remove her chest drains and she was discharged home 🐱🥰.
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✨ Meet Layla ✨, a beautiful kitten adopted from the SPCA New Zealand 🐾. Unfortunately, she became very sick and was diagnosed with a condition called pyothorax. This is a condition where a large amount of pus builds up in the chest cavity, preventing the animal from breathing properly. We don’t always find out the cause of pyothorax, but it can be caused by a bite wound penetrating into the chest cavity, pneumonia or other infection in the lungs, or a foreign body (like a grass seed) migrating into the chest🌾. 
 
Layla was diagnosed and had chest drains placed at an after hours clinic overnight,  then returned to her regular vet clinic Pet Doctors the next morning. Chest drains ideally need 24 hour monitoring and care at a veterinary clinic to prevent any complications, so her vet referred her to our VSA&E team for 24 hour management👩‍⚕️. 
 
Layla remained in hospital with us for just under 2 weeks, getting regular drainage and flushing of her chest drains and receiving intravenous fluid therapy and antibiotics💊, as well as plenty of cuddles from our nurses💛. Over the 2 weeks Layla showed constant improvement, she regained her appetite, became very smoochy and happy and her breathing returned to normal 🌟. Once the fluid production from her drains stopped we were able to remove her chest drains and she was discharged home 🐱🥰.

Comment on Facebook

Such a beauty, so worth all the love and attention to return her to good health.

Amazing – you guys are so great!

Her name absolutely suits her. A real princess.

Great work!

Whatta purdy kitty ❤

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🌺🌺ANZAC day🌺🌺 is a little unusual this year! hopefully we are also celebrating our last day at Level 4 lockdown.

A reminder to everyone that we are OPEN, and our A&E team are here and ready to help over the long weekend. 👩‍⚕️👨‍⚕️

During the lockdown, remember that we are not able to have visitors inside the hospital and we are operating as a DROP OFF service. To help us help you as efficiently as possible, please CALL AHEAD ☎️ with your pet’s emergency. Our hospital will be triaging patients; if you call ahead we can stagger our appointments and ensure we don’t have too many people waiting at once.

Be kind to each other and our staff, and stay safe. We hope you don’t need to visit us🤢🤧🤕, but we are fully equipped and ready to help if you do! 😷
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🌺🌺ANZAC day🌺🌺 is a little unusual this year! hopefully we are also celebrating our last day at Level 4 lockdown.   

A reminder to everyone that we are OPEN, and our A&E team are here and ready to help over the long weekend. 👩‍⚕️👨‍⚕️

During the lockdown, remember that we are not able to have visitors inside the hospital and we are operating as a DROP OFF service. To help us help you as efficiently as possible, please CALL AHEAD ☎️ with your pets emergency. Our hospital will be triaging patients; if you call ahead we can stagger our appointments and ensure we dont have too many people waiting at once. 

Be kind to each other and our staff, and stay safe. We hope you dont need to visit us🤢🤧🤕, but we are fully equipped and ready to help if you do! 😷

Fortunately, at VSA the huge majority of our clients have been respectful and understanding of the altered way we need to practice at the moment. You are the reason we do this job! 🙌🏼 A small number have not, and these encounters do take their toll on our people who are trying their absolute hardest to maintain a positive attitude in the face of this crazy situation we are all in.

We really look forward to having owners back in our hospital and brightening our day as much as you all do. It’s not far away now! In the meantime, if you do have to visit us, please be patient and kind to the team.Hey there, Kiwi animal owners!

We know right now is a really hard time for a lot of people. Our world has been turned upside down by one tiny little virus. As a nation, we have been doing great work together to keep COVID-19 at bay, but it seems the cracks are starting to show.

In the last few days, we’ve heard from several of our veterinarian members who have been on the receiving end of some pretty bad behaviour from owners. In response to this, we are asking you all to please treat your veterinary team with kindness and respect, now more than ever.

Veterinary teams are doing their utmost to ensure you and your animals are supported during this time. We are classified as an essential service, but this doesn’t mean we can carry on as normal. Veterinarians need to operate with the public health response at the forefront of their service provision – they need to keep their teams and you safe. Every decision to treat an animal in person needs to be made after assessing the risk of COVID-19, as well as the potential animal welfare issues. This means veterinarians are restricted to seeing only animals who need emergency care, or have conditions requiring urgent attention. This will mean your veterinarian has to decline your request for your animal to be seen for non-essential reasons. Please be understanding of the reasons for this.

Most clinics are currently working with reduced staff, to meet physical distancing requirements and lower the risk of their entire team being exposed to COVID-19. Cleaning and hygiene requirements have also increased. This means staff in clinics are still incredibly busy and everything takes longer. Right now, all of their days are tougher than normal.

Although we might all be hoping for a quick end to lockdown, we don’t know for sure that will happen. Whatever today’s Government announcement brings, your veterinary team is still there for you and your animals. They just need your understanding right now. Please, be kind.
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Fortunately, at VSA the huge majority of our clients have been respectful and understanding of the altered way we need to practice at the moment. You are the reason we do this job! 🙌🏼 A small number have not, and these encounters do take their toll on our people who are trying their absolute hardest to maintain a positive attitude in the face of this crazy situation we are all in. 

We really look forward to having owners back in our hospital and brightening our day as much as you all do. It’s not far away now! In the meantime, if you do have to visit us, please be patient and kind to the team.

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Having lost my best dog at the beginning of this disaster time I can really understand this post 😭 Veterinary Clinics are under major stress having to follow government rules which makes there job even harder than it normally is . However clients are also under major stress. Loosing a dog at any time is for me unbearable, yet alone at a time like this . . 1 day at a time forward, let's hope it all improves soon , for all our sakes 💕 💕

That’s sad to hear! Total respect for anyone out there working their butts off to keep us safe as well as our pets. Keep strong guys – you are so needed.🤗🤗

You guys were amazing with my boy and I’m so grateful for all your dedication and hard work during this time. Thank you for all that you’re doing to keep everyone and our fur babies safe and well. So so so appreciated

🌺🌼🌸🌹🌷💐🌺 thank you for all you do from Sid and Fi 🐾🐾

You guys are amazing! Kia Kaha guys xx Poppy L

Gosh you have to be a special type of asshat to be nasty people just doing their job, especially at a challenging time like this. Thank you for the amazing work you do, you have always been fantastic with us 🙏🏼❤️😍

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IMPORTANT COVID-19 Update

August 31, 2020

We understand that the COVID-19 virus can cause stress and uncertainty for all of our clients. We want you to know that we are following the guidelines of the World Health Organisation, the NZ Ministry of Health, and the NZ Veterinary Association to ensure that the risk of transmission of the virus is reduced in our hospital. We are working hard to ensure that we are able to stay fully operational and continue to provide care for our clients and their pets.

There is currently no evidence that animals play a role in the transmission of COVID-19 to humans, or vice versa.

From Monday the 31st of August, the Auckland region is under Alert Level 2.

Veterinary Specialists Auckland will continue to operate under Alert Level 2.

If you have any questions or need more information, please view our COVID-19 page or feel free to get in touch by clicking the button below.

Thanks, the VSA team.